Open new tab in Safari on the left

This script opens a new Safari window if none is open, maximizes the front window if minimized, and opens a new focused tab on the left with your bookmarks, with the text caret in the address bar.

I Googled for such a script to no avail so I made it myself. Bound it to ⌘T and scope Safari in Quıcĸsıɩⅴεʀ (of course you’re using Quıcĸsıɩⅴεʀ, what else?) or any other lesser hotkey application. You can still use New Tab menu item to open tabs on the right by changing the shortcut in the Keyboard Shortcuts section of System Preferences, say to ⇧⌘T.

If you open bookmarks:// you may notice a flicker when setting the focus on the first tab. It may be due to the applescript command used — if you find a better method put it in the comments.
Also, I used clicking “Open Location…” instead of setting the “AXFocused” attribute because the item hierarchy changes when in full screen mode.

Source: Mac OSX Hints

  

Make a UTC Dashboard clock widget

The OS X Dashboard doesn’t include a Clock widget specifically for GMT/UTC (Universal Coordinated Time). Even if you try choosing London, which is usually GMT, it doesn’t always match UTC—since London observes daylight savings time.

If you would like to have a clock that always shows the current UTC time, a good option is to use Freetown in Africa. They use UTC+00:00, and don’t ever change throughout the year.

Source: Mac OSX Hints

  

Fix OS X wrongly reporting an application is corrupted (OSStatus error 99999)

OS X stopped letting me install any software not coming from Apple. I wanted to update some software, and instead of seeing the “Quarantine Dialog” box telling that the software was just downloaded from Internet, I got a dialog box telling me that the software was corrupted.

In fact, it was not corrupted—I could use it on another Mac. The issue wasn’t affecting Apple software, only third-party apps. Only by setting the “Anywhere” setting in System Preferences -> Security for installing apps could I install software again. But I didn’t want to use that setting.

Looking in the Console, I saw error 99999 from CoreServiceUIagent when I tried to install software.

CoreServicesUIAgent[2105]: Error SecAssessmentCreate: L’opération n’a pas pu s’achever. (OSStatus erreur 99999).

After some research and help from Apple I found that a specific file’s corruption was the source of my woes.

A way to confirm that y …

Source: Mac OSX Hints

  

Disable Caps Lock, or at least get a warning when it's on

Few of us ever REALLY want Caps Lock turned on; when we do hit it, we do so accidentally. There are workarounds.

You can just disable the key entirely, of course. To do so, go to System Preferences, and choose Keyboard. Then click the Modifier Keys button at the lower right of the Keyboard tab. Finally, set Caps Lock to No Action (or, alternatively, have it pull side duty as a bonus Control, Option, or Command key).

That’s a great solution for those of us who only ever trigger Caps Lock unintentionally. But what about folks who genuinely want the option to quickly enter a mode for NONSTOP CAPITALIZATION, yet still want to avoid entertaining said mode accidentally? For those troubled typists, the solution is a free utility called CapSee. It displays an unmissable on-screen indicator when you’re in Caps Lock mode. ISN’T THAT GREAT?

Source: Mac OSX Hints

  

Help Apple cut back on iMessage spam

If you haven’t yet been hit by iMessage spam, you’re lucky: It’s awful. And it’s even worse when you realize that the spammer can know with certainty that the unwanted message really was delivered to you. As first noted by MacStories, Apple recently posted a way to deal with unwanted iMessages in your inbox.

Here’s the skinny.

When an unwanted, spammy iMessage arrives, first take a screenshot. (If you got the iMessage on your iOS device, press the Home and Sleep/Wake buttons at the same time. If you see the spammy iMessage on your Mac, use Command-Shift-3.)

Apple also needs to see the full email address or phone number of the person you received the spammy message from. You can either screenshot that data too, or copy and paste it.

Once you have all those details assem …

Source: Mac OSX Hints

  

Get back online at restaurants that boot you off the Wi-Fi after 30 minutes

You’re at a fine establishment which offers delicious, free Wi-Fi in addition to delicious, for-pay food. Perhaps served in bread bowls. But like your soup, the Wi-Fi eventually dries up: Restaurants and coffee shops that want to get customers out so that new ones can come in might boot you off the Wi-Fi automatically after thirty minutes.

But you’re not like other customers! You’re going back up to the line to buy another beverage and perhaps a scone. You deserve to get back on that Wi-Fi, dagnabbit. And there’s a way.

We’ve covered changing your MAC address via Terminal before. But now you know that you can use this trick to get back online at Panera Bread and other establishments with time-limited Wi-Fi.

First, get your current MAC address. You can find it in many places; one such place is System Preferences -> Network -> Wi-Fi -> Hardware tab. But since you’re about …

Source: Mac OSX Hints

  

More easily dial extensions with your iPhone

Whether you’re frequently calling a friend or loved one who’s at extension 123, or you know that to speak to a human in tech support you need to press 2, then 1, then 2 again—you’ve no doubt faced the annoyance that is dialing said numbers on your iPhone. But there’s a better way that doesn’t require you toggle the visibility of the keypad after your call first connects.

As The Mac Observer explains, you can add certain details to a contact’s phone number to let your iPhone virtually punch the right buttons on its own. When you’re editing a contact, you can press the +*# key at the bottom left of the keypad to insert a Pause or a Wait.

As TMO explains, a Pause instructs your iPhone to wait two seconds, and then dial whichever numbers come next. A Wait actually adds a custom button the phone screen, so that you tap a single key to enter in a new series of digits whenever you’r …

Source: Mac OSX Hints

  

Do more with Siri and navigation

You already know that you can use Siri to ask for directions. You might say, “Give me directions to 1 Infinite Loop in Cupertino, California,” or you might say “Take me home” when you’re out and about.

But there are a few other things you can say to Siri whilst your iOS device is helping you navigate, and you might not know about these options.

Ask Siri, “Are we there yet?”—or similar, less obnoxious incarnations of that query—and you’ll get an update on your estimated time of arrival. You can get more specific, too. Ask, “When is my next turn,” and Siri will give you the number of minutes until you should encounter it.

Tank running low? Ask Siri where the nearest gas station is, and you’ll get suggestions for fill-up spots along your current route. If you tap one, though, you’ll cancel your current navigation in lieu of the new destination instead.

Source: Mac OSX Hints

  

How to pull a password from Keychain to use in a script

Quite some time ago, I needed to create a script which would mount a network volume. I did not want to hardcode username and password into the script, so I kept looking for ways to accomplish this using OS X’s built-in Keychain. The following example uses a script to mount a network volume, using variables for the currently logged-in user, and fetches its password from the Keychain. Of course, you can do other things with this approach, so I figured it might be of use to someone out there.

The following is a combination of these 2 links:
http://hintsforums.macworld.com/showthread.php?t=163359
http://blog.macromates.com/2006/keychain-access-from-shell/

This script gets the password for the currently logged in user and pulls its password from the Keychain. It then mounts a share using the variables without hardcoded …

Source: Mac OSX Hints

  

Apple Holds Strong With Q313 Revenue of $35.3 Billion

By Alex Brooks Apple today announced financial results for its third fiscal quarter of 2013 which ran from January April 1, 2013 until June 30. Apple posted revenue of $35.3 billion and net quarterly profit of $6.9 billion, or $7.47 per diluted share. These results compare to revenue of $35 billion and net profit of $8.8 billion, or $9.32 per diluted share, in the year-ago quarter.
Gross margin was 36.9 percent compared to 42.8 percent in the year-ago quarter. International sales accounted for 57 percent of the quarter’s revenue.
Gross margin continues to be the number that many analysts watch closely as it continues to fall quarter to quarter. Primary reasons for this drop include the tighter margins on the iPad mini and heightened sales of cheaper iPhone models. To see this trend in action the key indicator is the changing average sales price of Apple’s top products. The iPhone’s ASP has dropped from $613 in the year-ago quarter to $581, the iPad has dropped from $515 to $436.
Apple reported the following number of shipments for its products during the quarter:
31.2 million iPhones compared to 26 million in the year-ago-quarter
14.6 million iPads compared to 17 million in the year-ago-quarter
3.8 million Macs compared to 4 million in the year-ago quarter
4.5 million iPods compared to 6.7 million in the year-ago quarter.

“We are especially proud of our record June quarter iPhone sales of over 31 million and the strong growth in revenue from iTunes, Software and Services,” said Tim Cook, Apple’s CEO. “We are really excited about the upcoming releases of iOS 7 and OS X Mavericks, and we are laser-focused and working hard on some amazing new products that we will introduce in the fall and across 2014.”
“We generated $7.8 billion in cash flow from operations during the quarter and are pleased to have returned $18.8 billion in cash to shareholders through dividends and share repurchases,” said Peter Oppenheimer, Apple’s CFO.
Apple provided the following guidance for its fiscal 2013 fourth quarter:
revenue between $34 billion and $37 billion
gross margin between 36 percent and 37 percent
operating expenses between $3.9 billion and $3.95 billion
other income/(expense) of $200 million
tax rate of 26.5%

Source: World of Apple

    

Just another Mac Tips site